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Nightstud 3 Game !EXCLUSIVE! Free 28


Tatum played a great all-around game and added five rebounds, four assists, two blocks, and a steal to go along with his game-high 29 points. The 3x All-Star scored 18 of his 29 in the second half and really held the Celtics together during the critical junctures of the game.




Nightstud 3 Game Free 28


Download: https://www.google.com/url?q=https%3A%2F%2Furlcod.com%2F2u6t4u&sa=D&sntz=1&usg=AOvVaw3S7q6L2Yz4CIgUBiJ82vsU



The use of logos here is a well-established practice "with its own rationale" that is "bound by its own specific rules and policies" - I'd think that would make it valid (and no cherry picking). The use of logos is legitimate and its unfair to ignore that and try to impose your own POV on their use, because what you've put forward amounts to little more than that. The use of non-free content is accepted here under specific conditions and that seems to escape you. You might want to go have a look at Wikipedia:Non-free content which accommodates the use of logos and other useful bits that can legitimately add something to the landscape.


Closed - Consensus that images are not freely replaceable with country flags is clear. Note, however, that this discussion was limited in scope, as it only addressed the issue of flags; other alternatives, if any, may be another discussion. In the case of flags, a given country may have multiple teams and those teams may not necessarily be "officially sponsored" by the state. As such, use of a country's flag may be insufficiently specific to identify a team and may be at risk of misrepresenting affiliations/relationships. A unique brand (e.g. logo) is a distinct identifier and an important aspect of a team's public identity. Images are thusly kept. Эlcobbola talk 15:38, 1 October 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


I'm bringing this logo here to be on the safe side, because it actually does seem to fall within Wikipedia:Non-free content criteria--more than many logos, I would image, since the content of the logo itself is discussed in the article. However, the image was listed at WP:CP on June 27th, and the IP editor who tagged the image here was quite correct in noting that "iconography and typography of Sistema de Transporte Colectivo de la Ciudad de México owns copyrights and its replica is not permitted without authorization of STC-Metro, check-it in the bottom of website ". Yup, it says that at the bottom of the website. That same IP editor has requested deletion of the related image at Mexico City Metro from commons. Given the "whois" check on that IP, I wouldn't be surprised if the objection were not somewhat (or someone) official. Is such a specific claim of rights sufficient to off-balance NFCC? --Moonriddengirl (talk) 00:25, 8 July 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


The images come from literary sources as have all the information I use. This debate should not even be here anyway. There have been no copyright renewals by Topps. The images are free as per this. Libro0 (talk) 18:06, 8 October 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


I don't think either of these images is permissible in Wikipedia; I am aware that they duplicate each other, however, and that is more reason why the same image (1 of the 3 poses) does not belong in the same article; I've seen arguments about that before (e.g. piece of a book cover used in both an infobox image of an author and in a section in same biog. article of that same subject (person). Here the repetition is not justifiable either. But in neither case is the image within fair use according to Wikipedia's policies on non-free images, because the images are actually copyrighted and from the Museum's photo archive (items in an exhibition which visitors to the Museum are prohibited to photograph at all), not in the public domain, and not free or out of copyright in either the U.S. or in Poland. The photographer is living and 91 years old. --NYScholar (talk) 06:56, 4 September 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


This image, used only in Cordite, is missing specific non-free use rationale (contains only non-free fair use in), and is IMHO 1. not necessary for the article, 2. potentially replacable by a free image. --Mormegil (talk) 16:57, 14 November 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


Is using an image of an American flag at half-mast screengrabbed from a film about the failure of Commodore International to illustrate the failure of the company appropriate? Seems to me that it's a violation of WP:NFCC #1 (no free equivalent) and #8 (significance). --Carnildo (talk) 01:21, 30 November 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


I'm in a dispute over this image (which was on the commons, but I nominated it for speedy deletion for copyvio and re-uploaded it here with a fair use rational). The dispute is two-fold. Is this image free or not? I clearly believe that because it's primary subject is a copyrighted newspaper then it clearly is "cover art" and should follow our WP:FUC. I don't believe that taking a picture of something which is copyrighted allows the photographer to release that copyrighted image into the public domain. So, is this image free or not? The second issue is, if it is not free, can it be used at Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Miami? I can't think of a fair use rational for that instance, but I think the image is fine at Florida Catholic. What do you think?-Andrew c [talk] 05:02, 10 December 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


Just wondering why Wikipedia requires it to be completely free use. Why can't I get specific permission for it to be used on a specific Wikipedia page? I would think you would have more luck getting more decent pictures for Wikipedia articles if there were some restrictions allowed. Before sending him the request for GNU permission, Mr. Gunty of FL Catholic sent me this permission which seems like it should be enough. From: Christopher Gunty (email removed)To: (email removed)Sent: Wed, 10 Dec 2008 5:14 pmSubject: Permission to Use photograph


OTRS permission has been received. Image is now tagged (and rightfully so this time) as free (GFDL this time, not PD), so my concerns have been addressed. Perhaps this discussion thread can be closed if no one else objects. We are lucky this time that a newspaper would release an image like that under a free license (try to get a large city daily to do that, ha!) And hopefully, while maybe not agreeing with it, Nancy has a better idea of our image use policy (and maybe she'll be more likely to trust my assessments in the future ;) Thanks everyone.-Andrew c [talk] 17:41, 15 December 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


The album cover is currently being used in the artist infobox to depict the artist and not the album itself. Since the artist is still alive a free-licensed image could be reasonably be found, so it fails the first criteria at Wikipedia:Non-free content criteria. Aspects (talk) 18:42, 17 December 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


This is a photo from a news website, showing two officers in combat gear. Further down the article is a free photo of an identically dressed officer. The non-free photo is specifically referenced in the text but shows nothing special/unique to the event, just a photo of officers in gear for which there is already a free equivalent. Fails "No free equivalent" and "Significance" in my opinion. XLerate (talk) 03:05, 7 February 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]


I was asked for help on using a non-free image for the article Bernard Madoff, but I'm not an expert by any means. He became very famous on December 11, 2008when he was arrested and alledgedly confessed to a $50 Billion securities fraud. All the news wires have photos on him but they appear to be copyrighted. No freely licensed photos of him appear to be available except an extremely fuzzy flicker photo which is now being used File:Madoff Leaving Courthouse.png .


As an image of a living person, I believe that a free equivalent could potentially surface in the future. As such, this image could be replaced. --Remy Suen (talk) 18:57, 2 April 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]


Hi: This 480-pixel tall portrait is a signed, copyrighted work that's clearly from the Corbis archive. Corbis is in the business of selling images, so the "fair use" claim is weak.. this is potentially a copyright violation. I do not think it can be acceptably used on Wikipedia to illustrate an article about a person. Otherwise, the Corbis archive is just being used to "harvest" portraits so Wikipedians don't have to bother locating free works. (For example, there may be a photo of this celebrity created by a U.S. government employee.) If someone would like to make the claim that 480 pixels tall (the height of a classic VGA monitor) is "low-resolution", can anyone point me to the Wikipedia page recommending a threshold for what constitutes low resolution? Thanks! Blackplate (talk) 21:40, 6 April 2009 (UTC)Reply[reply]


1950s Topps is an article about cards made by the Topps company in the 1950s. Currently it has one (non-free) card image for each year, shown in the list together with the size and the number of cards released that year. I think there should only be one example card at the top of the article. I added a card at the top, but did not remove the images from the list yet. Comments? --Apoc2400 (talk) 16:05, 6 September 2008 (UTC)Reply[reply]


While the use of this image for Joe DiMaggio (edit talk history protect delete links watch logs views) is probably appropriate (though one wonders if there isn't a copyright free archive with old baseball player photos), the use in New York Yankees (edit talk history protect delete links watch logs views) is purely decorative and fails WP:NFCC#8. There is no discussion of the image itself, nor does the image provide any encyclopedic information.


I cannot argue with its inclusion in Guernica (painting), of course, nor in Pablo Picasso, as it is perhaps his seminal work. What concerns me are the other seven. Two days ago, it appeared in eleven articles but had FURs for only four. I removed the image from the other seven articles; five have since been restored with rationales. However, these new rationales are largely copied from the previous ones, and thus may not apply. In particular, the rationale for use in the article Spain says "Its inclusion in the article(s) adds significantly to the article(s) because it shows the subject, or the work of the subject, of the article(s)," but it doesn't really, and there are plenty of free images of Spain available.


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